ROCA vulnerability and Axalto / Gemalto .NET v2 smartcards

I wrote about the ROCA vulnerability yesterday. It affects Infineon security chips used in TPMs and smart cards. While it is easy to identify TPM modules and computers using them, smart cards are more difficult.

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ROCA – Critical vulnerability in Infineon security chips

Looking back, we can find many examples of errors in the algorithms used to create encryption keys. Not very many of them, however, were found in chips designed and sold as high-security devices for email signing, verifying software integrity, VPN access, or citizen e-ID cards.

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Enigma Bridge encryption gets recognition – DEFCON, BlackHat, and ACM CCS

We have had a busy Summer so far. We introduced a new service for SSL certificate monitoring (keychest.net), presented at Black Hat USA, and gave a talk at DEFCON. The latest news was recognition of our cryptographic platform by reviewers of the ACM CCS conference. Continue reading Enigma Bridge encryption gets recognition – DEFCON, BlackHat, and ACM CCS

Let’s Encrypt in the spotlight

We have compiled all practical information we could find and written it up at Numbers you need to know. It’s a long list of restrictions, rate limits, and other useful information to keep in mind.  Here’s a few selected points that we found interesting. Big thanks to schoen from Certbot/EFF for pointing out numerous inaccuracies.

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As secure as rock, paper, scissors at once – Art of Defence, Demo at DEFCON

A team of great people from the Security Group at UCL and our start-up Enigma Bridge designed and implemented a practical security system tolerant to severe attacks compromising all parts of the supply chain. We will present and demonstrate it at DEFCON in Las Vegas.

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The potential of multi-party signing – as secure as its STRONGEST link

Is it really possible to design an encryption system, which is as strong as its strongest link? There is never a straight “yes” answer to this question, but we are now as close as one can get.

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Guardian, FT, etc. share their internet encryption keys with many

We have all heard about hackers stealing huge user databases with passwords as they are tempting bounties. FT, Guardian and many others create a new kind of reward – their internet encryption keys via CDNs – services speeding up web traffic.

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SSL certificates – 7 Free Spot Checks in one go – KeyChest

While implementing features of the certificate planner, we have added a few handy features to the KeyChest spot checker as well. It is now much more than just a tool to check when a website certificate expires.

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First BlackHat, now DEFCON: We talk “Trojan-tolerant hardware security in practice”

I have mentioned this multi-party encryption project of ours (Enigma Bridge) and University College London here earlier. If you’re planning to go to BlackHat US or DEFCON-25, come and see our talks about practical “ultra-secure” multi-party encryption for the cloud and some of the technology enabling it (Unchaining the JavaCard Ecosystem).

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