EV Certificates – Value for Money? Incl. Troy Hunt Q&A

I have come across Troy Hunt’s article yesterday about getting an EV certificate. His initial assumption is that EV certificate actually proves something, unlike many other seals of “security”. But is it really worth spending $80+/year?

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How Certbot and Letsencrypt Work (DNS and SNI-TLS automation)

We introduce an integration plugin for Let’s Encrypt. It provides integration for a variety of mechanisms that enable and simplify verification of domain control and certificate installation. We already tested it with Dehydrated (former letsencrypt.py) . It supports all existing verification methods: DNS, HTTP and TLS-SNI, in their current versions “01”.

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Your HTTPS Certificate Shows Where Its Key Comes From

We have extended the original research and can now use information from public keys (HTTPS, TLS, SSH, SSL) to audit cyber security management and compliance with internal standards.

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Letsencrypt’s Vulnerability Or Feature – Eternal Account Key

 

The growth of Let’s Encrypt is phenomenal – 7 million certificates in last four months. The remaining hurdle for automation is verification of domain ownership. Well, actually it is NOT true. We were doing syntax testing – hoping to get the right kind of verification error … only to discover we have been successfully verified without providing any information.

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Re: Investigating the Origins of RSA Public Keys

This post is about a research done by one of our co-founders. Petr showed that it is possible to find which tool or hardware device generated RSA keys from just a few public keys. I’m thinking it’s an attack, unexpected data leakage channel, but also an excellent source for audit-related analytics.

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“One time passwords” are not passwords

We did a bit of research into what IT start-up companies need in terms of security. I did expect that secure authentication / logons would be at the top but I was surprised that OTP (one time passwords) were at the bottom.

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